Grants

Community Outreach Grant Recipients for 2018

 

We are thrilled to announce our 2018 Community Outreach Grant winners, with a total of $10,000 going to the community. This year we received 13 grant applications from a cross section of non-profits. The following five applicants were chosen as the 2018 recipients:

THE ARC OF MULTNOMAH-CLACKAMAS has developed a program called NEED (Nutrition Education Equity for People with Developmental Disabilities). They will use their $2500 grant to provide opportunities for people with disabilities to garden and grow their own food through constructing wheelchair accessible beds and providing adaptive tools. Participants will learn the basics of composting, planting from seed, soil preparation, companion planting, attracting beneficial insects, and the use of vegetables in recipes. Leftover produce will be donated to Snowcap, an organization that provides emergency food for families in Multnomah County.

FRIENDS OF TREES will use their $2500 grant to plant native trees and shrubs at the Columbia Slough Natural Area with a team of 15 at risk high school youth leaders. Specific activities will include youth leadership and job skill training, removal of invasives, planting of 20 different native trees and shrub species, mulching, monitoring and community outreach. The project is supported by a variety of partners such as Portland Parks and Recreation, Rosemary Anderson High School and Portland Industrialization Center. This project offers an added bonus in that urban trees and natural areas are often considered as the first defense to global climate change due to their low cost-high return values.

TUCKER MAXON SCHOOL is a small non-profit school founded in 1947 as a school for the deaf. In the mid 80’s they began co-enrolling deaf and hearing children. They will use their $2500 grant to turn their school yard into an outdoor classroom that will inspire their students to cultivate the love of gardening, to understand the value of food and to participate in their community. Grant funds will be used to procure materials for raised beds, vermicomposting bins, seeds and seed starting equipment. Each classroom will start its own seeds and tend its own plot, with lessons on ecology, biology, and organic gardening built into their curriculum. One row of every bed will be planted for donation to The Oregon Food Bank, allowing students to directly support the broader community.

MARY RIEKE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL will use their $1500 grant to expand their edible garden space into a production garden. By providing a space for nature-based education, they hope to create future stewards and caretakers for the environment. Their production garden will allow students to produce fruits and vegetables for their school cafeteria and for donations to families in need. Their fifth graders will sell fresh produce as a class fundraiser at the Hillsdale Farmers Market.

THE BLOOM PROJECT donates fresh bouquets of flowers to hospice and palliative care patients, giving joy during end of life care. This volunteer organization serves between 500-600 patients per week thanks to generous donations from local grocers and wholesale flower companies. Their $1000 grant will help support their Program Manager, who oversees a team of 175 volunteers.